Contact

Dr. Hannelore Hämmerle
Press Officer
Phone:+49 89 30000-3980
Email:pr@...

MPI for Astrophysics

https://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/

Structure

Managing Director
Prof. Dr. Simon D.M. White

Scientific Members, Kollegium, Directors
Prof. Dr. Guinevere Kauffmann
Prof. Dr. Eiichiro Komatsu
Prof. Dr. Volker Springel
Prof. Dr. Simon D.M. White

External Scientific Members
Prof. Dr. Martin Asplund
Prof. Dr. Riccardo Giacconi †
Prof. Dr. Rolf-Peter Kudritzki
Prof. Dr. Werner Tscharnuter

Head of the administration
Hendrik Wanger

Press and Public Relations
Dr. Hannelore Haemmerle
Phone: 089 30000-3980
Cornelia Rickl
Phone: 089 30000-2201
Dr. Hans-Thomas Janka
Phone: 089 30000-2228

Seminars

Current research at MPA

NEWS at MPA

The ESA Planck satellite has found no new evidence for the puzzling cosmic anomalies that appeared in its initial temperature map of the Universe made public in 2013. The anomalies are faint features on the sky that appear at large angular scales. The Planck team now looked at the polarisation of the CMB, but their analysis, published today, revealed only some weak hints at best that some of the anomalies may be present. Using of polarization data to confirm or refute CMB anomalies was pioneered at MPA in 2010 by Mona Frommert and Torsten Enßlin. The latest study does not rule out the potential relevance of the anomalies for new physics but the mystery of the anomalies continues.

Planck finds no new evidence for cosmic anomalies

The ESA Planck satellite has found no new evidence for the puzzling cosmic anomalies that appeared in its initial temperature map of the Universe made public in 2013. The anomalies are faint features on the sky that appear at large angular scales. The Planck team now looked at the polarisation of the CMB, but their analysis, published today, revealed only some weak hints at best that some of the anomalies may be present. Using of polarization data to confirm or refute CMB anomalies was pioneered at MPA in 2010 by Mona Frommert and Torsten Enßlin. The latest study does not rule out the potential relevance of the anomalies for new physics but the mystery of the anomalies continues. [more]
Radio astronomers were able to identify a "stream" of magnetic fields and relativistic electrons along a filament that connects the galaxy clusters Abell 0399 and Abell 0401. Thanks to the data collected by the LOFAR (LOw-Frequency ARray) radio telescope, for the first time, it was possible to discover and measure these traces of the immense filaments of the cosmic web with observations at radio wavelengths. MPA operates one of the LOFAR antenna stations and participates in the search for diffuse radio emission from galaxy clusters and filaments.

A “cosmic aurora” lights up the connection between two galaxy clusters

Radio astronomers were able to identify a "stream" of magnetic fields and relativistic electrons along a filament that connects the galaxy clusters Abell 0399 and Abell 0401. Thanks to the data collected by the LOFAR (LOw-Frequency ARray) radio telescope, for the first time, it was possible to discover and measure these traces of the immense filaments of the cosmic web with observations at radio wavelengths. MPA operates one of the LOFAR antenna stations and participates in the search for diffuse radio emission from galaxy clusters and filaments. [more]
By Professor Anatoly Spitkovsky, Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University

Biermann Lectures 2019: Kinetic modeling of astrophysical plasmas

June 03, 2019

By Professor Anatoly Spitkovsky, Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University

[more]
 
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