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Last week the Gruber foundation announced that this year’s cosmology prize is awarded to the Planck team, which includes scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA). From 2009 to 2013 the European Space Agency’s Planck observatory collected data that has provided cosmology with the definitive description of the universe on the largest and smallest scales. “These measurements,” the Gruber Prize citation reads, “have led to the determination of cosmological parameters (matter content, geometry, and evolution of the universe) to unprecedented precision.”

Planck team receives Gruber cosmology prize

May 15, 2018

Last week the Gruber foundation announced that this year’s cosmology prize is awarded to the Planck team, which includes scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA). From 2009 to 2013 the European Space Agency’s Planck observatory collected data that has provided cosmology with the definitive description of the universe on the largest and smallest scales. “These measurements,” the Gruber Prize citation reads, “have led to the determination of cosmological parameters (matter content, geometry, and evolution of the universe) to unprecedented precision.” [more]
Gravitational lensing is becoming increasingly important for the study of distant galaxies and dark matter. Two groups have recently detected transient events emanating from far-away lensed galaxies, apparently due to extreme magnification of individual stars. MPA researchers Giulia Chirivì and Sherry Suyu contributed to the mass modelling of the galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403, one of the most efficient lenses in the sky. In 2014, the Hubble Space Telescope observed two unusual transient events that appeared behind the galaxy cluster in a strongly lensed galaxy at z~1, faster and fainter than any supernova, but significantly more luminous than a classical nova. The findings are published in Nature Astronomy by Rodney et al. (2018).

Cosmic flashing lights

Gravitational lensing is becoming increasingly important for the study of distant galaxies and dark matter. Two groups have recently detected transient events emanating from far-away lensed galaxies, apparently due to extreme magnification of individual stars. MPA researchers Giulia Chirivì and Sherry Suyu contributed to the mass modelling of the galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403, one of the most efficient lenses in the sky. In 2014, the Hubble Space Telescope observed two unusual transient events that appeared behind the galaxy cluster in a strongly lensed galaxy at z~1, faster and fainter than any supernova, but significantly more luminous than a classical nova. The findings are published in Nature Astronomy by Rodney et al. (2018). [more]